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    TwinBee Review (1986)

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    TwinBee is an arcade top-down shooter from the 80s where you play as some type of balloon. Here is our TwinBee Review.

    The game was developed and published by Konami, This version was originally released on January 7, 1986, for the Famicom in Japan only. It’s currently also available on the Nintendo Switch Online NES Service, this is also the version I played to review the game.

    The concept is pretty simple, you play as a balloon and shoot enemies and bullets that come your way to the bosses. The game is harder than it looks, you get distracted pretty quickly and some of the enemies have some pretty strange patterns that you dont always expect. To get some powers and get a bit stronger you need to shoot some bells and pick them up when they turn a specific color, you can split in 3, shoot faster, move faster, or shoot more bullets. I really liked this, but when you get hit, you lose the power you picked up, so when you get hit at the boss fight you are basically screwed.

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    For a game in this style, it’s very enjoyable to play for a bit, but it’s not something I would spend over an hour at a time in, mainly due to losing the powers so quickly because it’s a lot harder than I thought it was going to be. As someone who didn’t grow up with Arcade/Retro games, this is not something that is suddenly will get you into these types of games, but if you have or have played a few recently, I would surely tell you to give it a go just to see how far you can get.

    Looking for more reviews to read? Be sure to visit this page and discover a wide range of informative and insightful reviews.

    Author

    • Dex Fragg

      Founder of Game Craves and Reviewer.

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    SUMMARY

    Fun but quickly frustrating with not much variation.

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    Fun but quickly frustrating with not much variation.TwinBee Review (1986)